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  • would be good to create some narratives or "story-boards" (and/or mindmaps) of use-cases of encountering and using a "dashboard"
    • would be good to think of some non-typical learning situations (e.g. I want to improve my public speaking skills, or I want to learn to dance)
    • public speaking goal - might include tracking of e.g. number of spoken "ums or ahs", speech rate, volume, repeated words
      • one sub-goal might be the reduction of prep time or reduction of anxiety or both
  • want to be able to incorporate peer-review feedback (choose trusted peers and solicit/track their feedback on personal progress)
  • need to track what is discarded (doesn't work) as well as what works
  • before a match can be made between me and a thing that meets my needs, I need to get to know "me" i.e. understand my own needs
    • but a part of this process of acquiring self-knowledge is through trial-and-error matching
  • example of the King Keyboard - design developed through a complex evaluative process which took into account both frequency of keystroke as well as mobility and range of motion needs
    • an example of how we might provide a way for users to build self-defined evaluations from available building blocks - to allow for the evaluation of success based on complex combinations of parameters (like frequency of keystroke + typing-error tracking) - e.g. to feed into the creation of a personalised keyboard layout
    • can we build some examples of this?
  • transparency of adaptations - give user ability to know what adaptations have been made if they want to - so they can apply it elsewhere
  • learning sequences should be self-defined (i.e. subject matter, levels - e.g. I can learn math by studying music)
  • consider an academic example of a challenging subject e.g. division 
    • how do we introduce the concept to a learner who has no prior knowledge, where do we begin?
    • use a real-world example? consider the example of Turtle Geometry and using the movement of the body (e.g. division as one big step vs. several small steps)
    • how can we create an experience of playful self-discovery - like a quest game that tracks and quantifies progress 
    • consider examples like Scratch 

 

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