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The following image is a mind-map created to look at the big picture of of the "My Lifelong Learning" (MyL3) Toolkit space. In exploring this space we hoped to take a step back from previous detailed design work, while at the same time exploring different paths or starting points for further design work.  

We aim to create a digital toolkit that will allow for personal exploration and discovery of the things that help us learn best (in any context, including e.g. structured learning in a classroom, or lifelong learning of skills at any stage). This toolkit (or collection of toolkits) will help us define a desired path toward achieving our goals or fulfilling ambitions or visions for ourselves and our communities.

Ideas discussed during this session (and captured in the mindmap image below) include the following:

  • Self-assessment (and self-reflection as a necessary input to self-assessment) appears at the centre of the diagram, as this is a central aim of the toolkit - i.e. to provide a way for users to discover for themselves how they learn best - by assessing their own progress according to self-defined criteria (rather than externally-imposed criteria)
    • we need to continue to balance this with connections to others and community-building aspects, since we don't want to promote pure individualism ("each person for themselves")
      • as a result we included a strong link to collaboration and sharing
  • Physical spaces where the toolkit may be used include classrooms, job centres
  • Digital spaces where the toolkit may be used include the Developer Space, and some kind of "Designer Space" as well
  • We discussed the kind of usability testing model we want within the job centres (where we will be trying out a simple version of this tool) - i.e. a more participatory model where users are involved in the design process from the beginning, and where usability testing can be more self-directed
  • The toolkit will include an option for automated or manual data tracking - this could be something like:
    • data from fitness or activity tracking wearable devices
    • environmental data (location, time of day, weather conditions, temperature, etc)
    • what I ate for breakfast
  • Journalling remains an important element of the toolkit - as a way to allow for less structured self-reflection
  • We made a connection between data tracking and the Citizen Research project 
    • this project aims to provide a platform to allow regular citizens to collect and share data of any kind - to increase understanding, collaboration, connection and mobilisation toward change
  • Privacy and ownership of data are important aspects to consider when we talk about personal data tracking and collection
    • how do we ensure that personal data is protected and that control stays in the hands of the individual?
    • consider data-bartering - trading data with others
    • this brings up the idea of the value of data - being able to assign value to our personal data and therefore trade it or share it according to that value 
  • We want to keep it as simple as possible - how can we use filters or give options in other ways to avoid overwhelm?
  • Teaching must be on the continuum of learning - 
    • consider skill-bartering as one model for teaching
  • Instead of talking about goals (and as there are many existing tools to help with goal-setting, to-do lists, timeline creation, etc) we talked about more adaptive and open-ended alternatives to this that might include
    • visions
    • dreams
    • ambitions
    • and we considered the idea from Deng Xiaoping who once described managing the economy as "crossing the river by feeling the stones" — in other words being able to set a direction but remain adaptive according to what we feel/discover at each new step 
    • a user may still want to be able to look at a history or some kind of timeline looking back or forward
  • Interpretation
    • how to support/guide the interpretation of personal data?
  • Context
    • e.g. journalling in the context of a particular set of data 
    • or e.g. tracking data in the context of a particular journal entry?
  • Value (of personal data)
    • defining the value of personal data - what do I share, with whom
    • data-bartering with others based on that value 
    • community building (due to data sharing) adds value
  • We considered traditional crowd-sourcing vs. self-led or self-mobilised data collection and collaboration which can result in community-building around an issue
  • Perhaps it should be called "My (insert appropriate context-dependent name) Lab" - since "Lifelong Learning" may not be appropriate in all contexts
  • We listed a number of potential use-cases and contexts, including:
    • job centres
    • Gr. 5 classroom
    • someone teaching themselves to play guitar
    • a developer
    • someone wanting to price-track groceries
    • tracking the "bad date" list
    • someone wanting to track the side-effects of prescription drugs and connect with others experiencing same
    • activity or fitness tracking

 

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