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Ratings indicate: # of Fluid apps affected/frequency & security matrix rating

  • This is a set of icons - maybe they look like ship beacons or lighthouses or something
  • Labeled beacons are equivalent to "tags"
  • The user can drop them as they go around the web application during a session. 
  • A map can show all the beacons and their tags of beacons
  • Beacons always display and are remembered from session to session unless the user gets rid of them
  • If a user can see a beacon, they can click on it to get to its page.  It provides a visual shortcut to a particular page.
  • beacons could be dropped on the page the user wants to get to, but they access their beacons on a dashboard, or from a pop-up
  • rating - 4/2b
  • Allows a user to see a web site from another user's view point (an instructor can see their class web site from a student's perspective)
  • User can go into and out of this alternative 'reality' whenever they are in Sakai/uPortal
  • This may be the assumption of a role that the user is entitled to adopt.  E.g. an instructor may be entitled to assume the "student" role when viewing her course.
  • This should be contrasted with the "become another user" proposal being considered in the uPortal project (where the system doesn't know you're not that user).
  • rating - 4/2a

(based on limited Sakai knowledge (smile)

  • Replaces "my workspace" which is apparently not that useful
  • user can create portlets here that are meaningful to them
  • use these portlets to navigate to frequently visited or important sites, (perhaps each class for a student or faculty)
  • user can also add links here (store their list of "favourites")
  • rating: it could affect all 4, but not sure how that would be implemented technically/1-Sakai, hard to rate for other apps since most other apps already have it
  • Breadcrumbs indicate the current position in the hierarchy (not the Little Billy path through the space)
  • rating: 4/2b
  • May be implemented as the tab component, as links, etc.
  • rating: 4/1
  • has two states -- view and edit (which allows you to rename, move, remove the tab)
  • uPortal edit mode may also include editing tab content (though this may be a default state--you can always edit)
  • probably an implementation of the top nav component
  • rating: 4/2b
  • Layout may be represented as a hierarchy of folders rather than sets of columns under tabs.  A folder would contain portlet windows organized in columns, as well as subfolders.
  • An outline view of folder names and portlet titles could assist in navigation.
  • Folder navigation could be the underlying implementation
  • rating: 4/1

This is a generic component for for traversing such things as file system trees, mail folder hierarchies, and portlet layouts.

  • could be used to implement the Nested Left Navigation Component
  • could be  used to implement navigational view in the File Management Viewer
  • rating: 4/1
  • An encoded version of the site structure, or machine-readable map of the space that the system can turn into various types of navigation (e.g. using Breadcrumb, Top Nav, Nested Left Nav, Tab components, Folders, etc.)
  • It could also represent the position of multiple "sub-pages" or portlets on an individual page.
  • It could display the tagged beacons or scent-marks deposited by the user on previous rambles through the site.
  • It could display a path between way-points visited on this or previous excursions through the site.
  • future-looking
  • rating: 4/1
  • This is an icon that persists on every page. If the user clicks it, a little div area or pop-up appears showing some type of site map indicating where the user currently is in the page navigation hierarchy. E.g. a "you are here" indicator.
  • Colour coding could be used to show the user all the sections they have visited. 
  • It's some combination of a site map and breadcrumbs that tells the user where they currently are in the site and gives them the option to navigate to other places.
  • Imagine you are in a new city and have a map.  This is a dot on a map that moves with you, showing your current position relative to the entire space.
  • May be a subset, or part of, #10.
  • rating - 4/2a
  • See Scenario 4 above.
  • What controls do the users see? (submit, print, resize, cancel)
  • Not losing any work the user does in detached windows (e.g. entering text) is an essential part of their management.
  • Multiple detached windows may be be active, and may be launched from different portlets or tools.
  • There are many different ways the user may depart from interaction with the windows. Each has to be handled.
  • User should be informed of state of window upon his return (espec. persons for whom visual context isn't helpful or sufficient).
  • future-looking
  • rating: 4/1
  • portlet takes over the display window
  • question: how much of portal window is displayed
  • rating: 4/1-uPortal, 2a-others
  • Fire and Forget Manager Component
  • Could this be a design pattern?
  • Launching an application that appears in its own window
    • app doesn't know it's been launched from the portal, and the portal doesn't have any control over it, portal window is usually obscured
  • rating: 2-uPortal & Kuali/1
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